FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Department of Psychology

PSIR 230 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
History of Philosophical Thought
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 230
Fall
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
First Cycle
Mode of Delivery -
Teaching Methods and Techniques of the Course -
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s)
Course Objectives This course aims to introduce students to the main questions and problems investigated in the history of philosophy, from its early beginnings in ancient Greece to the present.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • to explain and assess the main currents of thought in the history of Western philosophy.
  • to compare and contrast the prominent themes and arguments of different schools of thought.
  • to interpret epistemological, ontological and moral implications of rival accounts of human emotions and attitudes such as anger, empathy, care, anxiety, hope, and thoughtlessness as well as of reason, knowledge and scientific method in history of philosophy.
  • to develop their analytical and interpretive skills through a guided reading of key figures in the history of philosophical thought.
  • to apply philosophical arguments of past thinkers to contemporary academic and public debates.
Course Description This course explores a variety of questions and problems about human existence that have been addressed in great depth in the history of Western philosophy. What role do emotions play in human existence? What can we know, and how can we know it? What is the difference between knowledge and mere belief? How is scientific method possible? Can we learn from our past mistakes? What is existence? What is the relevance of some basic human attitudes such as care, hope, irony, thoughtlessness, and anxiety to both individual and collective existence? We will examine these questions and their significance as they appear in different thinkers and schools of thought in the history of Western philosophical tradition.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 Human Emotions Julia Annas, “Humans and Beasts: Understanding Ourselves,” Ancient Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press, 2000, 1-18.
3 Pleasure and Happiness Julia Annas, “The Happy Life: Ancient and Modern,” Ancient Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press, 2000, 36-54.
4 Reason and Knowledge Julia Annas, “Reason, Knowledge, and Scepticism,” Ancient Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press, 2000, 55-74.
5 In-Class Writing
6 Science and Method Nigel Warburton, “Could You Be Dreaming?” A Little History of Philosophy, Yale University Press, 2011, 62-68.
7 Optimism and Pessimism Nigel Warburton, “The Best of All Possible Worlds?” A Little History of Philosophy, Yale University Press, 2011, 93-98.
8 Knowledge, Freedom, Hope Nigel Warburton, “Rose Tinted Reality” & “What if Everyone Did That?” A Little History of Philosophy, Yale University Press, 2011, 110-120.
9 Sympathy as a Moral Sentiment Christopher J. Berry, “Sympathetic Spectators,” Adam Smith: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press, 2019, 29-45.
10 Midterm Exam
11 Irony and Anxiety Nigel Warburton, “Life’s Sacrifices,” A Little History of Philosophy, Yale University Press, 2011, 152-158.
12 Understanding the Human Psyche Nigel Warburton, “Thoughts in Disguise,” A Little History of Philosophy, Yale University Press, 2011, 176-182.
13 What is Existence? Nigel Warburton, “The Anguish of Freedom,” A Little History of Philosophy, Yale University Press, 2011, 196-201.
14 Thoughtlessness and Radical Evil Nigel Warburton, “The Man Who Didn’t Ask Questions,” A Little History of Philosophy, Yale University Press, 2011, 208-213.
15 Concluding Remarks: Machines, Humans, and the Future Nigel Warburton, “Can Computers Think?” A Little History of Philosophy, Yale University Press, 2011, 234-238.
16 Final Exam

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

Julia Annas, Ancient Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press, 2000. ISBN-13: 978-0192853578

Christopher J. Berry, Adam Smith: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press, 2019. ISBN-13: 9780198784456

Nigel Warburton, A Little History of Philosophy, Yale University Press, 2011. ISBN-13: 978-0300187793

 

*All course readings are available at the University Library and as open sources.

Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
1
20
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
20
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
30
Final Exam
1
30
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
3
70
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: '.16.' x total hours)
16
0
Study Hours Out of Class
16
2
32
Field Work
0
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
0
Portfolio
0
Homework / Assignments
1
5
5
Presentation / Jury
0
Project
1
7
7
Seminar / Workshop
0
Oral Exam
0
Midterms
1
11
11
Final Exam
1
17
17
    Total
120

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To have knowledge of basic concepts, theories, approaches (behavioral, biological, cognitive, evolutionary, social, developmental, statistical, humanistic, psychodynamic, and socio-cultural), and current applications specific to the field of psychology by using current course materials and instruments.

2

To have basic knowledge and skills about the applications in the different subfields of psychology.

3

To have basic knowledge about the testing and measurement instruments used in different subfields of psychology and basic level skill that does not require expertise in carrying out applications in different subfields of psychology.

4

To make use of other disciplines that may contribute to psychology and have basic knowledge about the contribution of psychology to these disciplines.

X
5

To have cumulative knowledge about the position of psychology as a scientific discipline in Turkey, the conducted research, applications and problems encountered from past to present in the field of psychology.

6

To have the competence to conduct a research individually and/or as a team using the knowledge acquired in the field of psychology, interpret the findings obtained by using scientific problem solving and critical thinking approaches.

X
7

To have the ability to construct a research hypothesis, create a research design, collect data, analyze it, report it in a scientific writing format, and interpret it by using basic knowledge related to testing and measurement, research methods, and statistics acquired in the field of psychology.

8

To have the competence to share the theoretical and applied knowledge acquired in the field of psychology with the experts and lay people by using the required information and communication technologies in scientific studies and events that benefit the society.

9

To have knowledge of the relevant professional and ethical values ​​in the domains of psychology and respect individual differences and human rights in research and practices related to psychology.

10

To constantly renew herself/himself professionally by following both national and international publications in the field of psychology, the developments in testing and measurement instruments and software programs used in the discipline.

11

To establish written and verbal communication with experts and lay people by using both Turkish and English.

X
12

To be able to speak a second foreign at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest

 


Social Media

NEWS |ALL NEWS

Izmir University of Economics
is an establishment of
izto logo
Izmir Chamber of Commerce Health and Education Foundation.
ieu logo

Sakarya Street No:156
35330 Balçova - İzmir / Turkey

kampus izmir

Follow Us

İEU © All rights reserved.